Facebook Content ID for Video is Coming, Addresses Freebooting

Facebook Content ID for Video is Coming, Addresses Freebooting

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If you’ve been involved in the online video space during the past year, you’ve likely heard plenty about the rise of Facebook video.  Video on Facebook, after the introduction of autoplay last fall, has exploded to the tune of more than 4 Billion video views each day. While the rise of Facebook video has occurred over this relatively short time, it has not been without its issues.  Chief among these is the issue of some Facebook users uploading video content that they have taken from somewhere else, without the proper rights to do so. Facebook has come under some fire lately, particularly from Hank Green, whose ‘Lies, Theft, and Facebook‘ article whipped many into a frenzy, and put a big torchlight on the issue of Facebook and freebooted video content.

Unlicensed video uploads are an issue that Facebook has been addressing, albeit behind the scenes. The radio silence about ripped content was confusing both for brands, and creators, and for those users who legitimately didn’t believe they were doing anything wrong by uploading videos found elsewhere on the Internet.  Not only that, but most online video publishers and consumers are used to dealing with YouTube for video – which has had a robust Content ID system in place for many years.

But today, we have some welcome clarity as Facebook issued a statement confirming that they “get it” and are exploring new rights management features so that video creators can control their own content on the site.

Facebook Content ID: Video Rights Management

Apparently, videos uploaded to Facebook are already subject to ‘audio fingerprinting’ via Audible Magic software which can help to identify duplicate or unauthorized videos from making their way onto the platform. Facebook also has a reporting process in place so copyright owners can alert the site to any violations of copyright. Persistent offenders are dealt with by the social networking site but clearly, many have slipped through the net.

Facebook is strengthening these existing features, but is also building more robust video matching tools that will be rolled out to a few select creators in beta.  Their new “ContentID” technology will:

“Allow creators to identify matches of their videos on Facebook across Pages, profiles, groups, and geographies. Our matching tool will evaluate millions of video uploads quickly and accurately, and when matches are surfaced, publishers will be able to report them to us for removal”.

While it would be nice if this could be rolled out to everyone immediately, Facebook has stated that they plan to Roadtest the features with a select group of Facebook video partners – MCNs, media companies, and individual creators. Facebook’s long-term goal is to provide support to video creators that will hopefully address the freebooting issues once and for all. The site confirms that the process won’t happen overnight, but they are working hard to solve the problem, and are committed to finding a solution.

What do you think?  Let us know in the comments below.

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