Even in the English-speaking parts of the world of digital video, it helps to be multilingual. Why? Because the United States and Great Britain are two countries separated by a common language.

For example, social video showrunners, an industry term for executives who are responsible for content strategy and development at both broadcast and digital first media companies, are faced with difficult challenges that someone in England might describe as the “group of death”: (1) deciding what kind of video to create and publish on social channels to optimize views and grow specific audiences; (2) understanding what genres of content brands want to invest in, and (3) figuring out how to outpace competitors, while reducing the costs associated with content misses.

At the same time, branded video sellers, another industry term for executives who are focused on customer acquisition and retention as well as selling sponsored content, branded experiences, custom social activations, or influencer marketing, also face tough challenges that a Limey might call “the knockout stage.” They need to understand what brands are investing in sponsored content, craft their story for the market, and report on campaign performance. Ultimately, they need to win more brand deals. And, once they have a deal, they need to be prepared for renewals and driving continued business.

Well, I feel your pain. And, here’s what I can do to ease your suffering for at least the next six weeks and perhaps into the foreseeable future. I’m going to share the strategic insights, critical data, tactical advice, and trends in the digital video marketing business contained in two recent reports from Tubular Labs. The first is entitled “2018 Football World Cup Report.” And the other is entitled “YouTube Sport Report.” You can download both now, and get access to some unique insights, data, advice, and trends.

World Cup Videos Will Be Huge for 2018’s Event

Tubular Labs’ 2018 Football World Cup Report

Now, most North Americans call the sport that will be played during the upcoming 2018 FIFA World Cup “soccer,” but most of the fans in the rest of the world call it “football.” That’s why Tubular’s 2018 Football World Cup Report, which was written on the other side of the pond, is really about soccer, even though it doesn’t use that term. It also includes several suggestions on how to “capitalise” on the year’s biggest tentpole event. And the ginormous event that we’re talking about is the one in Russia where the “fixtures” (aka “matches”) will be held from June 14 to July 15, 2018.

So, what strategic insights does the report provide? Well, the most-viewed of all official World Cup videos ever is “Shakira – Waka Waka (This Time for Africa) (The Official 2010 FIFA World Cup Song),” which has more than 1.8 billion views.

In second place is Pitbull’s “We Are One (Ole Ola) (Olodum Mix),” which has over 634 million views.

So, music represents a major content opportunity for social video showrunners and branded video sellers. For example, Clevver Music created a video entitled, “Jennifer Lopez & Pitbull World Cup 2014 Opening Ceremony: Better than Shakira’s 2010 Performance?” It got almost 1.6 million views.

And unofficial music content also did well during the quadrennial events. For example, “Shakira – La La La (Brazil 2014) ft. Carlinhos Brown,” which supported Activia’s World Food Programme and its School Meals initiative, received more than 969 million views even though Activia, a brand of yogurt owned by Groupe Danone, wasn’t an official World Cup sponsor.

Influencer-made songs also performed well! Check out “HYMNE EURO 2016 : Nos Chansons Pour Les Bleus” by Cover Garden, which was published during the 2016 UEFA European Championship. Okay, this new version of the cheesy team song got only 246,000 views in its first 30 days, but it also had an engagement rate benchmarked across all content that was 4.8x more engaging than average.

This kind of content has another benefit: It’s a way to capture a broader audience. According to Tubular’s 2018 Football World Cup Report, world cup videos focusing on music reached 12% more females than the average Euro 2016 content on YouTube.

Tubular’s 2018 Football World Cup Report also reveals:

  • The most-viewed non-music World Cup videos ever
  • How long your YouTube video should be
  • When you should post your World Cup videos for 2018’s event
  • Which soccer influencers create engaging content

Wait a tick. The US soccer team didn’t even qualify for the upcoming 2018 FIFA World Cup tournament. So, is it worth losing sleep over this tentpole event if you live and work on this side of the pond? Well, consider this: Tubular’s report says that 8% of the views of Euro 2016 content came from the US, which didn’t have a team in that tournament either. Hey, some Americans are fans of the sport and other Americans are rooting for the old country.

So, social video showrunners and branded video sellers will want to read all 25 pages of Tubular’s 2018 Football World Cup Report. The alternative is about 40 sleepless nights from now to mid-July worrying about how you’re going to make it through the group of death and then survive the knockout stage without reading the strategic insights, critical data, tactical advice, and trends in the digital video marketing business in a free report.

Sports Are Becoming the Next Big Thing on YouTube

Tubular Labs’ 2018 YouTube Sport Report

But wait, there’s more! And social video showrunners and branded video sellers will also want to download and read Tubular’s YouTube Sport Report. How can you tell that the authors of the report live and work in Dear Old Blighty? The dead giveaway is the use of the term “sport.” Folks from the States would use the term “sports.” So, when you see the term “football” in the report, remember the authors are actually talking about “soccer” if you’re here in the U.S.

Nevertheless, there are some additional insights, data, advice, and trends in the YouTube Sport Report that even a Yank can use. For example, here are the main takeaways:

  • Sports content on YouTube is big and growing faster than the music, entertainment, and people & blogs genres.
  • 13% of the global audience watching the English Premier League clubs comes from the US and another 2% comes from Canada.
  • The biggest content opportunities on YouTube are in extreme sports, mixed martial arts/boxing, and basketball.
  • Branded partnerships on sports are growing 111% faster than the category itself.

So, once again, social video showrunners and branded video sellers must choose between harnessing data to make content decisions, or investing in content they could have known in advance would not work. That’s a no-brainer – especially since it’s free to download the 17-page report. That’s why I’m confident that reading the report will make your life a little easier – at least for a while.

If you are interested in a solution that lasts longer, then let me respectfully suggest that you request a free demo of Tubular’s social video analytics suite. I know, I should disclose that I write for this passionate group of engineers, designers, marketers, and video enthusiasts. But, it’s an option that you should know about.