Copyright is a legal concept, enacted by most governments, giving the creator of an original work exclusive rights to it, usually for a limited time. Generally, it is “the right to copy”, but also gives the copyright holder the right to be credited for the work, to determine who may adapt the work to other forms, who may perform the work, who may financially benefit from it, and other related rights. It is a form of intellectual property (like the patent, the trademark, and the trade secret) applicable to any expressible form of an idea or information that is substantive and discrete.
Copyright initially was conceived as a way for government to restrict printing; the contemporary intent of copyright is to promote the creation of new works by giving authors control of and profit from them. Copyrights are said to be territorial, which means that they do not extend beyond the territory of a specific state unless that state is a party to an international agreement. Today, however, this is…

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Want To Contact YouTube? Here's All The Info You Need

It's a sure thing that anyone that has used YouTube seriously, either as a creator or an avid user, has come across an issue with the site that they can't resolve on their own. YouTube isn't easy to contact but they do provide resources that you can use to get in touch, and we list them here.
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YouTube Copyright Law As Explained By Puppets from Glove & Boots

YouTube got the Glove & Boots gang to explain an often confusing topic: copyright law as it pertains to YouTube. A boring topic turns extremely entertaining when these puppets get into the topics of takedown notices, ContentID, and Fair Use.
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How to License Music for Your Videos

You want to use a copyrighted song in your video. When do you need permission to use a song? How do you go about doing getting a license to use it? Luckily, there is a process you can go through and it doesn't have to be painful.

Viacom Comes Up Short Against Google/YouTube In Court Once More

YouTube-Viacom: Round II went to YouTube thanks to the Digital Millennium Copyright Act. Because YouTube has policies in place that take down copyrighted material when they are told about it, a Federal Court has denied Viacom's appeal.