Last week, Ooyala issued its Q2 2014 Global Video Index Report, providing insights on the continued evolution of multi-screen video consumption. The report highlights the rapid growth of mobile video consumption and the proliferation of premium, live and long-form video on more screens. Its findings underscore the need for content providers to take advantage of new forms of big data analytics and audience measurement to better understand online audience behavior, help guide content strategies and maximize revenue.

As faster wireless networks are built around the globe to provide higher bandwidth for smart devices, mobile viewership continues to rise. In the past year, mobile video viewing has more than doubled to represent over 25% of all online viewing, increasing 127% year-over-year and 400% in the past two years. Between February and June 2014, the share of all online video plays viewed on mobile devices increased six percent, rising from 21 percent to 27 percent. As the amount of video available for mobile devices increases, Cisco forecasts that by 2018 mobile video traffic could make up 69 percent of the world’s Internet traffic, reinforcing the opportunity for content providers, broadcasters and publishers to build business-sustaining revenue streams with digital video – particularly on mobile devices.

Rainy Days and Video Views

Ooyala report on Boston weather

A special section of this quarter’s Global Video Index takes a more light-hearted look at the potential impact of weather on multiscreen viewing habits. Using Boston as a representative city, the report compares how consumption differed during two separate weeks with distinctly different weather patterns – one cold, rainy week and one warm, sunny week, across the same set of video providers.

As one might expect, video engagement surged on rainy days, as viewers likely stayed indoors and shifted to larger screens. People spent 40 percent more time watching videos on desktops when the rain came, compared to the sunny days. Online video engagement on tablets also increased by roughly 5 percent. Interestingly, the warm week saw nearly six times more views — as measured in the raw number of plays — than the cold week, suggesting viewers used mobile devices to watch “snack-sized” content while they enjoyed the better weather outside and away from their larger screen devices.

Additional Highlights from Q2 2014 Global Video Index

  • Viewers look to big screens for big chunks of entertainment. Consumers on connected TVs spent 81 percent of their time watching videos longer than 10 minutes.
  • Mobile devices remain the favorite “snacking tool.” Viewers spent 45 percent of their time watching videos of six minutes or less in length.
  • On tablets, viewers spent 23 percent of their time watching video of 30-60 minutes in length, more than on any other device.
  • On connected TVs, viewers spent 65 percent of their time watching videos 30 minutes or longer; and over half of that time (54 percent) was with content longer than 60 minutes.

You can download the full report from the Ooyala site.