Video marketers assume that YouTube is a great place to reach and engage Millennials. Because it is. According to the recently revised Statistics page on YouTube, “YouTube overall, and even YouTube on mobile alone, reaches more 18-34 and 18-49 year-olds than any cable network in the U.S.”

Okay, so the 18-34 year-olds are Millennials. But YouTube also tells us that its core audience (aka Gen C) is not an age group; it’s an attitude and mindset defined by key characteristics. And 80% of Millennials just happen to share this psychographic profile. Confused yet?

How Moms Use YouTube and Online Video

Well, maybe it will help to take a closer look a big part of YouTube’s audience that aren’t exactly Millennials. You may know them as “Moms” (aka women 25-44 with kids, especially Millennial Moms 25-34).

To get a better understanding of how Moms use YouTube, Google partnered with Ipsos and TNS to survey Moms on their video viewership behavior. And they found that the top three reasons Moms are watching videos on YouTube are: for “Me Time” (aka entertainment/relaxation); to find out how to do something; and to get ideas for arts, crafts, DIY, recipes. So, what else did this new research discover?

YouTube Moms: Turning Online for Advice (Stats):

  • 83% of Moms search online for answers to specific questions about being a parent. 3 in 5 moms turn to online video for their answers.
  • 81% of YouTube-watching Moms watch how-to videos, which is significantly higher than the average viewer (75%).
  • Moms constantly turn to YouTube for advice and tips – whether it’s about a specific product or advice on how to take care of your baby. In fact, one of most popular baby-related how-to searches on YouTube are for videos of lullabies to put babies to sleep.
  • Before purchasing a product or service, Moms look for informational content like how-tos and tutorials to help them decide. That gives video marketers an opportunity to meet them in what Google calls a “micro-moment” and provide Moms with useful information.
  • 58% of moms search for video content on YouTube about products before deciding to make a purchase.
  • And 69% of these Moms go to YouTube first, over other online video platforms.
  • After making a purchase, Moms look to videos for advice about how to put a product together, or for further information about the product they bought. 69% of Moms said they’d rather watch a YouTube video than turn to the user manual, or pick up the phone to customer service.

Now, I was given a copy of this new research in advance of its release. And to get an independent reality-check of the data, I shared it with my daughter-in-law, Melanie R. Jarboe. She’s an Associate at Kotin, Crabtree & Strong, a general practice law firm in Boston. She represents families who have children with special needs as well as individual clients with disabilities. And she’s a Mom with two kids: my granddaughter, who is almost 3 years old, and my grandson, who is five months old.

After reviewing the new research, Melanie said, “I’ve been looking to expand my repertoire of bedtime songs and it did not occur to me that YouTube might be helpful in that regard until I read the article above.”

However, she added this personal observation, “My daughter recently started expressing interest in ballet and in going to see the Nutcracker, but she’s still little and is also a sensitive kid at times, so I looked up some videos of the Nutcracker Ballet to show her the ‘scary’ parts with Herr Drosselmeyer and the rat king, as well as the fact that the audience has to sit in the dark and be still and quiet. We ended up watching a few of the other dances as well and had an interesting discussion about how the ‘snow’ dance was full of dancers pretending to be snowflakes. She liked the idea that you could use dance to pretend to be something else”. Hey, you can’t make this stuff up.

Moms Use YouTube All Through the Purchase Funnel

The new research also found that Moms turn to YouTube at all points during the purchase path, which should be of particular interest to video marketers. Now, some of the leading brands have already recognized that Moms are turning to YouTube at all points during their purchase journey – including before and after making a purchase. And these brands are creating content on about common baby advice tips that Moms are already coming to YouTube to seek out.

For example, Johnson Baby’s YouTube channel reaches Moms as they’re looking for advice and how-to tips.

Johnsons Baby’s YouTube channel has grown a huge following for their original how-to content with more than 42.2 million views and over 28,000 subscribers. And according to Tubular, it ranks 245th out of 74,000 channels in Education – Parenting.

As I was writing this article, my wife observed that Nanas (aka grandmothers) use YouTube, too. And just yesterday, she and our granddaughter watched Daniel Tiger’s Neighborhood on YouTube. Yes, Nanas are Moms, but that’s another column for another day.